Recent quotes:

Doses of Neighborhood Nature: The Benefits for Mental Health of Living with Nature | BioScience | Oxford Academic

This growing problem has, at least in part, been attributed to the increasing disconnect between people and the natural world that is resulting from more urbanized, sedentary lifestyles (the “extinction of experience”; Miller 2005, Soga and Gaston 2015). This is supported by research that shows interactions with nature promote psychological restoration (Kaplan 1995), improved mood (Hartig et al. 2003, Barton and Pretty 2010, Roe and Aspinall 2011), improved attention (Hartig et al. 2003, Ottosson and Grahn 2005) and reduced stress and anxiety (Ulrich et al. 1991, Grahn and Stigsdotter 2003, Hartig et al. 2003, Maas et al. 2009).

How Trees Calm Us Down

an additional ten trees on a given block corresponded to a one-per-cent increase in how healthy nearby residents felt. “To get an equivalent increase with money, you’d have to give each household in that neighborhood ten thousand dollars—or make people seven years younger,” Berman told me.