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How Exercise Helped Me Stop Drinking | Fitness Magazine

What's a sure way to convince yourself you don't have a drinking problem? Waking up at 5 a.m. every Saturday for training runs. Being productive and accomplished gave me a free pass to reward myself and celebrate into the wee hours of the morning. I tried to manage and control my drinking via my "work hard, play hard" motto, but then came my early 30s and four small children. My husband often worked at night, which left me flying solo with the kids. I'd laugh with my other mom-friends about drinking a bottle of wine to cope with the stress. What I didn't share was that I hated who I was when I drank. And I certainly didn't tell them about the blackouts and intense anxiety that came with it.

Running May Be Good for Your Knees - The New York Times

These findings suggest that a single half-hour session of running changes the interior of the knee, reducing inflammation and lessening levels of a marker of arthritis, says Robert Hyldahl, a professor of exercise science at B.Y.U. and lead author of the study, published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology. But sitting for 30 minutes also changed the knee, he points out, which he and his colleagues had not expected. Sitting seemed to make the knee biochemically more vulnerable to later disease.

Faster = lighter

The model shows that cadence has a direct effect on energy efficiency of running and ground-foot impact intensity. Furthermore, it shows that higher cadence implies lower risk of injury and better energy efficiency.

Running + challenges lead to neurogenisis

Voluntary physical exercise (wheel running, RUN) and environmental enrichment both stimulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis but do so by different mechanisms. RUN induces precursor cell proliferation, whereas ENR exerts a survival-promoting effect on newborn cells. In addition, continued RUN prevented the physiologically occurring age-related decline in precursor cell in the dentate gyrus but did not lead to a corresponding increase in net neurogenesis. We hypothesized that in the absence of appropriate cognitive stimuli the potential for neurogenesis could not be realized but that an increased potential by proliferating precursor cells due to RUN could actually lead to more adult neurogenesis if an appropriate survival-promoting stimulus follows the exercise. We thus asked whether a sequential combination of RUN and ENR (RUNENR) would show additive effects that are distinct from the application of either paradigm alone. We found that the effects of 10 days of RUN followed by 35 days of ENR were additive in that the combined stimulation yielded an approximately 30% greater increase in new neurons than either stimulus alone, which also increased neurogenesis.

Stop running, start sobbing

Participants reported to the lab on Monday following their regular workout and completed a series of questionnaires, and these same questionnaires were completed at the same time of day on the next 4 d. The dependent variables consisted of state and trait anxiety (STAI), and tension, depression, anger, vigor, fatigue, confusion, and overall mood (POMS). Increases in total mood disturbance, state anxiety, tension, depression, and confusion across days were significant (P < 0.05), and vigor decreased. The pattern of increasing mood disturbance with exercise deprivation was followed by mood improvement to baseline levels when exercise was resumed. We concluded that a brief period of exercise deprivation in habitual exercisers results in mood disturbance within 24-48 h.

50 Years of (Mostly) Fantastic Footwear Innovation | Runner's World

The guide, in the April 1967 issue, featured 14 “flats.” Eleven of those models came from three brands: Adidas, New Balance, and Tiger. The reviews spent as much time discussing each brand’s overall reputation as it did detailing the differences in the fairly similar shoe offerings. Each review included selected quotes, most being some variation of “Absolutely the best racing shoe I’ve ever worn.” The guide listed “best” shoes in two categories. The Tiger Road Runner topped the training category; Tiger’s Marathon led the racing shoe list.

The Lovely Loneliness of the Solitary Run | Runner's World

I applaud the running tribes who are inspiring new people to enjoy our sport. And I love that celebrating the difficulty of hard work is integral to the appeal of many of them. I’ve reluctantly enjoyed the few times I’ve joined such groups, and admit that, if I relax my default defenses, the cheers and music and hearty camaraderie can produce a rush. But if you, like me, find yourself longing for the quiet of the empty road or trail, accompanied by nothing but the sound of your breath and the wind in the trees, know that you are not alone. Our tribe dates back to before the first running boom. It is a tribe of solitary silhouettes moving quietly through still early mornings on empty roads. We’re not outcasts. We’ve chosen this loneliness, and it defines and enriches us.

How to Run Your First Marathon | POPSUGAR Fitness

"Think of every day between now and your future half marathon as available time to get stronger and improve your endurance." It made so much sense — waiting to start training is like procrastinating on a project you're afraid of. I've already started running a little bit more than usual to get 2017 off on the right foot.

One Weight-Loss Approach Fits All? No, Not Even Close - The New York Times

To help people find an effective way to lose weight, obesity medicine specialists say they start by asking if there is an obvious cause for a person’s excess weight, like a drug that can be switched for something else. If not, they suggest patients try one thing after another starting with the least invasive option, and hope something works. “There are 40 therapies I can throw at a patient,” Dr. Kaplan said. “I will try diets and aerobic exercise and sleep enhancement. I have 15 drugs.”

Charlie Engle Runs for His Life, Once Again - The New York Times

there was a small gravel track. A little at a time, Engle began running on it. […] he decided to run 135 miles, the same length as Badwater, and to do it on the same day in July that Badwater was being held on the West Coast. Of course he had to prepare — at one point the prison was in lockdown, and he couldn’t get outdoors to do the 15-miler he had planned that day. So he ran the equivalent of 15 miles in place in his cell. And although it took him two days — because he had to go back to his cell at night — he pulled it off, running 81 miles the first day and 54 the next. “Prison officials weren’t too happy about it,” recalled Howell Weltz, a former prison inmate who befriended Engle and confirmed Engle’s account of prison life. “They tried to bust it up by saying he was violating the rules by not wearing a T-shirt,’’ Weltz said. “Charlie calmly walked over to where his T-shirt was, put it on, and then continued running. He has a lot of guts.”

'Minimal' shoes may reduce running injuries | EurekAlert! Science News

"Our research tells us that becoming accustomed to running with a forefoot strike in shoes that lack cushioning promotes a landing with the lowest loading rates, and this may be beneficial in reducing the risk of injury"

The secrets of the world's happiest cities | Society | The Guardian

Researchers for Hewlett-Packard convinced volunteers in England to wear electrode caps during their commutes and found that whether they were driving or taking the train, peak-hour travellers suffered worse stress than fighter pilots or riot police facing mobs of angry protesters. But one group of commuters report enjoying themselves. These are people who travel under their own steam, like Robert Judge. They walk. They run. They ride bicycles.

Runner self-talk

The British author Alan Sillitoe got it right in his 1958 short story “The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner”: “They can spy on us all day to see if we’re … doing our ‘athletics,’ but they can’t make an X-ray of our guts to find out what we’re telling ourselves.”

What We Think About When We Run

The (notably tiny) group of runners spent most of their time thinking about pace and distance—translated cynically, about how hard it was to move at their desired speed (“Come on, keep the stride going, bro”) and about how soon they could stop (“Come on, you have enough energy for a mile and a half”). But, after that, the runners mostly thought about how miserable it was to run. “While all the participants had periods during their run where they appeared to be comfortable and thinking about other things,” the researchers wrote, “pain and discomfort were never far from their thoughts.” Feet went numb, stomachs ached, lungs heaved, exhaustion loomed, hills hurt, heat sapped, vomit threatened; all told, fully a third of runners’ thoughts concerned the downsides of running. The remaining thoughts pertained to the runners’ immediate environment, which the researchers further subdivided: runners had mostly pleasant thoughts about terrain and wildlife, and mostly unpleasant thoughts about weather, traffic, and the other people around them.

Does a Shoe’s Heel-to-Toe Drop Matter? | Runner's World

Researchers at the Luxembourg Institute of Health followed 533 recreational runners for six months while the subjects did all of their running in models with a 0-, 6-, or 10-millimeter drop. The shoes’ respective stack heights were 21 millimeters in the heel and forefoot; 21 millimeters in the heel and 15 millimeters in the forefoot; and 24 millimeters in the heel and 10 millimeters in the forefoot. The shoes were otherwise identical. With injury defined as a leg or lower-back pain that resulted from running and cut into planned training for at least one day, 25 percent of the runners reported being injured during the six-month study period. The study’s main finding was that injury rates among the three groups were similar—runners got injured at roughly the same rate whether their shoes had a heel-to-toe drop of 0, 6, or 10 millimeters.

Running triggers brain repair and extends life in mouse model - Medical News Today

The researchers allowed some of the mice the opportunity to run by installing a wheel into their cages. Surprisingly, the mice given the opportunity to run lived more than 12 months (a relatively normal lifespan for a mouse). On top of their extended lives, the running mice also put on more weight and achieved a better sense of balance, compared with their less active siblings. "We saw that the existing neurons became better insulated and more stable. This means that the unhealthy neurons worked better and the previously damaged circuits in the brain became stronger and more functional." Dr. Matías Alvarez-Saavedra, lead author However, these changes were reversed if the opportunity to exercise was taken away. Once the running wheel was removed, the symptoms returned, and their lives were once more cut short.

Can Running Kill You?

Even if we did have perfect information, though, we’d still be left to roll the dice—as we do in countless decisions every day. What if it turned out that running at least 40 miles a week would extend life by two years for 99 percent of people, but shorten it by 10 years for the other 1 percent? Would you carry on? What if, instead, the proportions were 99.9 percent and .1 percent? Such decisions are deeply uncomfortable, which is why we avoid thinking about them when we, say, take an antibiotic or step outside on a sunny day.

Do You Feel Dumber When You Stop Running?

Lie in bed for 20 days, one classic bed-rest study found, and your aerobic fitness will drop by 28 percent. Other effects like impaired glucose tolerance start after as little as 10 days.

Use it or lose it: UMD study shows that stopping exercise decreases brain blood flow | EurekAlert! Science News

Dr. Smith and colleagues measured the velocity of blood flow in brain with an MRI scan while they were still following their regular training routine (at peak fitness) and again after 10 days of no exercise. They found that resting cerebral blood flow significantly decreased in eight brain regions, including the areas of the left and right hippocampus and several regions known to be part of the brain's "default mode network" - a neural network known to deteriorate quickly with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. This information adds to the growing scientific understanding of the impact of physical activity on cognitive health.

Speaking Up for Mental Illness – Running for Mental Health | Trail And Ultra Running | Community. Industry. Adventure.

After years of struggling, hitting rock bottom and not having the strength to get back up, I finally decided to get help. I moved back home with my parents. Away from temptation, away from people. Somewhere that I could start again. I slowly built my life back from there, I started a new career, I reduced my drinking, I met a lovely girl named Jess. And I started running. Running was my outlet and my therapy. That feeling while running is indescribable, and when I’ve finished a long run I’m exhausted and sore but feel 10 feet tall and the strongest I’ve ever been.  In the space of 2 years I went from an extremely depressed alcoholic, barely able to run 5km, to completing over 6 ultra marathons and running from Burnie to Hobart (340km).

Zen and the Art of Running – Personal Growth – Medium

Ask someone what it means to do a good job on an intricate project at the office and it could take them an hour to explain and require charts and graphs. Ask that same person what it means to do a good job in their next race and I bet they can tell you in less than a minute, no PowerPoint required.

Recovery Is All in Your Head | Outside Online

“Interfering with the natural stress response, particularly by prolonging it, is maladaptive,” says Kiely. “The brain and body will only dedicate resources to rebuilding if it doesn’t feel an emergency is around the corner.” In other words, rushing to work and cranking on a deadline report after a challenging morning workout may seriously mitigate positive physical gains.

Run musings

You stop thinking about running and your mind wanders off to play. Random thoughts percolate to the surface for inspection and further reflection. I think I’ll grow some grapes behind the barn next spring. How will I deal with that asshole at work? Who should I contact about remodeling the bathroom? What’s for dinner tonight? Soon, you discover that the miles have slipped by like drunken memories and your at mile 8.

Meb Keflezighi, Bernard Lagat, and the Secret to Running Forever - The New Yorker

“There are only two ‘secrets,’ ” Joyner told me, when I asked how a runner can continue to succeed until age forty and beyond. “Keep your VO2 max up by doing intervals, and don’t get injured.”

Paper tape can help prevent foot blisters, study shows

In 2014, Lipman and his colleagues recruited 128 runners participating in the 155-mile, six-stage RacingThePlanet ultramarathon event that crosses deserts around the globe, including the Gobi Desert and deserts in Jordan and Madagascar. Paper tape was applied to just one of each of the runners' feet. The untaped areas of the same foot served as a control. (Which foot got the tape and which didn't was chosen at random). The tape was applied by trained medical assistants to either the participants' blister-prone areas or, if they had no blister history, to randomly selected locations on the foot. The paper tape was applied in a smooth, single layer before the race and at subsequent stages of the race, Lipman said. The medical assistants followed the runners for 155 miles over seven days. For 98 of the 128 runners, no blisters formed where the tape had been applied, whereas 81 of the 128 got blisters in untaped areas. "It's kind of a ridiculously cheap, easy method of blister prevention," Lipman said. "You can get it anywhere. A little roll coasts about 69 cents, and that should last a year or two." He added, "The best way to make it to the finish line is by taking care of your feet."

How running kills cancer

linked to the release of adrenaline (also called epinephrine), a hormone that is central to the "fight-or-flight" response. Adrenaline production is known to be stimulated by exercise. The researchers say that, the production of adrenaline results in a mobilization of immune cells, specifically one type of immune cell called a Natural Killer (NK) cell, to patrol the body. These NK cells are recruited to the site of the tumor by the protein IL-6, secreted by active muscles. The NK cells can then infiltrate the tumor, slowing or completely preventing its growth. Importantly, the researchers note that injecting the mice with either adrenaline or IL-6 without the exercise proved insufficient to inhibit cancer development, underlining the importance of the effects derived only from regular exercise in the mice.