Recent quotes:

Birth year dictates which flu strains make you sick

They discovered that people born before the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968 – in which H7N9’s ancestor, H3N2, first emerged – were largely protected from the older-type H5N1, but were vulnerable to severe illness from H7N9. Those born after 1968 showed the opposite responses. This explains a pattern that has puzzled scientists since 2013, when H7N9 itself was first detected: flu viruses from the H5N1 “family” disproportionately affect children and young adults, while those more closely related to H7N9 are more likely to infect older adults.
Harvard University said it had a 2.1 percent drop in applications for the next school year, led by a 5.8 percent fall-off from the Midwest. Atlanta-based Emory University reported a 3.3 percent decrease from the region, while Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire, attributed a 14 percent slide in total applications partly to a 20 percent drop from the Midwest. The decline at Dartmouth was the biggest in 21 years. Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, is projecting an 8 percent drop from the region and 11 percent overall.
Starting in the 1970s, Jews began, over all, a decline in social status, while blacks began a corresponding rise, at least as measured by the doctors’ directory. But both trends are very slow. At the current rate, for example, it will be 300 years before Ashkenazi Jews cease to be overrepresented among American doctors, and even 200 years from now the descendants of enslaved African-Americans will still be underrepresented.
In Ngram, the term “millennials” begins to explode in the late ’90s—just before “Generation X” collapses. We passed the baton to the next sucker. My prediction? Hold fast, millennials. This current wave of punditry will peak and then start declining six years from now. In 2020, about half of you will have turned 30. You’ll no longer be young—and therefore no longer scary—and today’s rhetoric about your entitlement and narcissism will evaporate. You’ll be in charge.