Recent quotes:

Walgreens pill reminder, activity tracking both improved medication adherence in study | MobiHealthNews

Activity tracking led to 11.2 percent higher adherence for antihypertensives, 5.1 percent higher adherence for oral antidiabetics and 4.5 percent higher adherence for antihyperlipidemics. Tracking blood pressure or blood glucose led to 6.8 percent higher adherence for patients taking antihypertensives and 12.3 percent higher adherence for oral antidiabetics. In another study, presented at Society of Behavioral Medicine's 37th Annual Meeting earlier this year, Walgreens demonstrated that users who took advantage of Walgreen's mobile pill reminder app were 12.3 percent more likely to have optimal adherence to oral antidiabetics, 11.3 percent more likely to have optimal adherence to antihypertensives and 9.1 percent more likely to have optimal adherence to antihyperlipidemics.

Apple quashes some e-mails?

I have no recollection of ever telling my Mac about this account, nor did I have or any reason to. I don't use their desktop apps for these functions. I'm strictly a web guy. My guess is that when I set up my iPhone to access the account, it shared the information with my Mac without telling me. And further, the Mac has a spam filter (this is just a theory) and this is where the mail deletions were happening.

Hillary Clinton’s e-mails: a timeline of actions and regulations - The Washington Post

June 29, 2011: A State Department cable to employees is issued under Clinton’s signature (as are all cables) after Google revealed that hackers were targeting the personal e-mail accounts of U.S. government employees. The cable warns: “Avoid conducting official Department business from your personal e-mail accounts.”

Hillary‘s private ISP was OKed?

One final thought: I’d imagine Secretary Clinton at some point emailed the White House. I made the mistake of emailing the White House from my personal account once (!) during my term, and managed to get back a nastygram from Counsel about it. How or why didn’t the White House tell Hillary to use her official .gov email account?It could be that they knew the entire classified and unclassified email system was compromised and decided that the smartest thing to do was for her to use her personal email instead.

Returning to his biz, Bloomberg gets into the nitty gritty

He had struggled to find the paper towel dispensers, artfully hidden behind the mirrors in the company bathrooms, so he had them labeled with arrows. Emails between staff members are marked with the time the employee entered the office, a measure that has been reinstated since Mr. Bloomberg returned and that some suspect is intended to encourage employees to arrive earlier (or to shame them for arriving late). In a memo, he asked his staff members to make sure their security cards do not cover their name badges so that he can identify them more easily.
That said, the emails in the indictment and S.E.C. complaint appear powerful on their face. In an exchange in December 2008 among Mr. Davis, Mr. Sanders and Mr. DiCarmine, the men discuss the need to come up with $50 million to meet a loan provision. Mr. Davis responds “ugh” in one message.
The mix-up happened when MIT combined two separate lists for an electronic mailing about financial aid. At the bottom was a footer that said “You are on this list because you are admitted to MIT,” according to Peterson. By merging the lists in a program called MailChimp, admissions officers mistakenly imported the footer from a list of students accepted under early admissions. The note at the bottom was supposed to say “You are receiving this e-mail because you applied to MIT and we sometimes have to tell you things about stuff,” according to the blog.
In fact, mapping attention to power in an organization gives a clear indication of hierarchy: The longer it takes Person A to respond to Person B, the more relative power Person A has. Map response times across an entire organization, and you’ll get a remarkably accurate chart of social standing. The boss leaves e-mails unanswered for hours; those lower down respond within minutes. This is so predictable that an algorithm for it—called automated social hierarchy detection—has been developed at Columbia University. Intelligence agencies reportedly are applying the algorithm to suspected terrorist gangs to piece together chains of influence and identify central figures.